Tuesday, December 12, 2006

The Arab Shuk



2 Comments:

Anonymous Victor Ashkenazi said...

We have some things in common, my friend, living in this world of 3 dimensions as human beings. We both deeply appreciate details and we are always astonished with the beauty of the "big picture". Between the small and the big, the dark and the bright, we are not able to choose one set of them to stay in peace. While watching and registering the big, the small calls for our attention. We cannot leave the details there alone, waiting for us to explore them. I think people like us are energized by sensitiveness. It is not easy to feel in a world less sensitive everyday. We suffer because of that. We are trying to reflect and explain a feeling, in a photo, in a picture, in a drawing, in a design, in a poem, in a color. We succeed doing that, but only partially. We know the exact dimensions of things in our hearts, but we are not able to choose proper lenses to reflect properly a starving-thin child to other people.
http://victor-ashkenazy.blogspot.com/

1:11 AM  
Anonymous Ronn BenHarav said...

I missed this comment.

I don't really follow you...Though I agree with you that there are things that only the soul, or even only the יודע תעלמות could quantify and empathize completely, most humans upon seeing a picture of a starving thin child would automatically have emotions of empathy that are very explicable.

The most difficult things to portray is the knowledge of God with the multitude of paradoxes which he presents. For example, he is all good and yet there is evil in the world. He knows all and yet we have, for the most part, freedom of choice. We are his children and yet we often suffer. Balancing this paradox can boost a sensitive person to the highest levels of spirituality or be exceptionally destructive, for who can be more cruel than a sensitive person who believes he's been betrayed...on the contrary, who can be more pious than someone who is exceptionally sensitive to his own actions.

The largest paradox to me, is that when we are dust in the earth, all we will have acquired is the mitzvot we performed and the acts of kindness we did in this world. Until then, all we have is the time to know Hashem through those actions.

Regards,
Ronn

9:32 AM  

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